And this differs from the botnet folks how?

Revision3

First, they willingly admitted to abusing Revision3’s network, over a period of months, by injecting a broad array of torrents into our tracking server. They were able to do this because we configured the server to track hashes only – to improve performance and stability. That, in turn, opened up a back door which allowed their networking experts to exploit its capabilities for their own personal profit.

Second, and here’s where the chain of events come into focus, although not the motive. We’d noticed some unauthorized use of our tracking server, and took steps to de-authorize torrents pointing to non-Revision3 files. That, as it turns out, was exactly the wrong thing to do. MediaDefender’s servers, at that point, initiated a flood of SYN packets attempting to reconnect to the files stored on our server. And that torrential cascade of “Hi”s brought down our network.

This is one of the many reasons that vigilante justice is such a bad idea. If the FBI investigation doesn’t lead to an indictment or a plea, I might change my mind — there are plenty of hackers who have faced criminal charges for doing what they thought was the right thing, but which they weren’t authorized to do.

(And if giving false information to Myspace is a crime but deliberately bringing down someone’s network because you think you might not like them isn’t, well…)

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